To Sir, with Love
Born Today
Home / To Sir, with Love

To Sir, with Love

Year:
Duration:
105 min
Genres:
Drama
IMDB rate:
7.7
Director:
James Clavell
Awards:
1 win & 2 nominations
Details
Country: UK
Release Date: 1967-06-14
Filming Locations: Tower Bridge, London, England, UK
Earnings
Budget: $640,000
Gross: $42,432,803 (USA) Rentals $19,100,000 (USA)
Cast
Actor
Character
Judy Geeson
Judy Geeson
To Sir, with Love
Sidney Poitier
Mark Thackeray
Christian Roberts
Denham
Suzy Kendall
Gillian Blanchard
Ann Bell
Mrs. Dare
Geoffrey Bayldon
Theo Weston
Faith Brook
Grace Evans
Patricia Routledge
Clinty Clintridge
Chris Chittell
Potter (as Christopher Chittell)
Adrienne Posta
Moira Joseph
Edward Burnham
Florian
Rita Webb
Mrs. Joseph
Fiona Duncan
Euphemia Phillips
Fred Griffiths
Mr. Clark
Mona Bruce
Josie Dawes
Marianne Stone
Gert
Dervis Ward
Mr. Bell (P.T. Teacher)
Peter Atard
Ingham (as Peter Attard)
Sally James
(as Sally Cann)
Grahame Charles
Fernman
Michael Des Barres
Williams (also as Micheal Des Barres)
Margaret Heald
Ellison Kemp
Albert Lampert
Chitra Neogy
Elna Pearl
Bonnie Lythgoe
(as Bonita Shawe)
Anthony Villaroel
Seales
Richard Willson
Curly
Stewart Bevan
Carla Challoner
Joseph Cuby
Sally Gosselin
Kevin Hubbard
Howard Knight
Lynne Sue Moon
Miss Wong
Jayne Peach
Jeanie Clarke (as Jane Peach)
Gareth Robinson
Tich Jackson
Roger Shepherd
'Fats' Buckley
Stephen Whittaker
Ric Rothwell
Band member (drums, vocals) (as 'The Mindbenders')
Bob Lang
Band member (bassist) (as 'The Mindbenders')
Eric Stewart
Band member - guitar & vocals (as 'The Mindbenders')
Lulu
Barbara 'Babs' Pegg
Cyril Shaps
Mr. Pinkus (uncredited)
Donna Shawe
Miss (uncredited)
Did you know?
Trivia
Lulu performed the title song, which went straight to No 1 in the US.
Share this
The first movie role for Patricia Routledge.
Share this
Judy Gleeson is only eight years younger than the actress playing her mother.
Share this
Goofs
When The Mindbenders play the graduation dance, they are very obviously performing a lip-sync to studio recordings. A piano is audible, though no one visible is playing one. The guitar heard is a 12-string, though Eric Stewart is seen playing a 6-string Gibson Les Paul. Eric Stewart's lead vocals are very obviously double-tracked, a common technique for hiding performances with pitch issues.
Share this
Despite the story covering many weeks, the kids supposedly wear exactly the same thing every single day.
Share this
The band plays a song at the end with an audible tambourine, but there is no-one on stage with a tambourine.
Share this
Quotes
Mark Thackeray: If you apologize because you are afraid, then you're a child, not a man.
Share this
Denham: [to Pamela Dare] I know what's bothering you! You fancy him!
Share this
Mark Thackeray: It seems you know so little, and are so easily amused, I can look forward to a very happy time.
Share this
Faq
Q
What is 'To Sir, With Love' about?
A
Unemployed engineer Mark Thackeray (Sidney Poitier), a black British Guyannan living in London, accepts his first job teaching at North Quay Secondary School in London's East End. What he gets is a mob of white, unruly, defiant seniors, particularly class tough Bert Denham (Christian Roberts) and precocious Pamela Dare (Judy Geeson), both of whom excel at one thing...teacher baiting. With no prior teaching experience, Mark must dig deep into himself and into his students, to find a way to keep his head until his long-sought for engineering job comes through.
Q
How closely does the movie follow the book?
A
Those who have both seen the movie and read the book report that the film is pretty faithful to the book, in essence at least, but trimmed for length.There is more regarding the author's position in British society and his feelings about being black in that society. There are a couple of chapters covering his job search and how he was treated, a lot more characterization and back-story. The movie also tends to eliminate a lot of the scenes in which overt racism was described and dissected as a social illness. In the book, his relationship with Gillian (Suzy Kendall) is explicit -- he even goes to meet her parents -- and there is a nasty scene involving a racist waiter in a restaurant. In the movie, Thackeray's relationship with Gilliam was not so detailed. Another major difference that viewers mention is that the book is set in the 50s whereas the movie moves the setting into the 60s.
Q
A Note Regarding Spoilers
A
The following FAQ entries may contain spoilers. Only the biggest ones (if any) will be covered with spoiler tags. Spoiler tags have been used sparingly in order to make the page more readable.
Share this
Photos from cast
Judy Geeson